Strawberry Rhubarb Jam

Strawberry Rhubarb Jam is like spring in a jar. It’s the perfect accompaniment to pancakes, yogurt, oatmeal and toast. In full disclosure, I’ve been caught eating it straight from the jar with a spoon.

Strawberry Rhubarb Jam | mountainmamacooks.com

I am so ready to welcome summer. In fact, we’re already acting like it’s here. As the kids finish the last weeks of school and we try our hardest to stay focused and in a routine, it’s the last thing any of us want to be doing. The gorgeous evening weather makes us want to ride bikes until our bellies remind us that we need to go in and eat. We’ve planted our garden and anxiously check every afternoon to see if it’s started to sprout. We’re sleeping with the windows open and the grill has seen more action in the last week than it has all winter.

Strawberry Rhubarb Jam | mountainmamacooks.com

As much as I love the winter months and often joke I could live in a cold environment year round, I’m always so thrilled when summer rolls around that deep down inside I know living in winter 12 months a year would make me go crazy. We’re so fortunate to have four distinct seasons in Utah and each one is beautiful in it’s own right. The spring has been absolutely marvelous and with everything so green right now and we’re spending more time outside more than we’re inside. It’s safe to say we’re all digging it.

Strawberry Rhubarb Jam | mountainmamacooks.com

After months of hiding under bulky sweaters and eating comfort foods, it’s time to strip the layers and lighten things up. I’m craving salads, smoothies, and letting my inspiration for cooking come from what I see in the produce section. Strawberry shortcake is totally acceptable for breakfast, right? The strawberries have been so gorgeous, I couldn’t resist. And between me and you, it’s happened more than once! I blame it on this whipped cream. Seriously the goods!

Strawberry Rhubarb Jam | mountainmamacooks.com

Last week, while I was grocery shopping, the produce guy was unpacking some organic rhubarb right as I walked past. Without thinking, I grabbed a bundle. Not sure of what I was going to do with it but knowing it would involve strawberries. As much as I wanted to make a pie or tart, I’m feeling like I need to lay off the desserts for a bit so I decided to make some jam instead. We had just finished off the last jar of peach jam I put up last summer so it was the perfect solution!

Strawberry Rhubarb Jam | mountainmamacooks.com

Strawberries and rhubarb are a classic combination. This jam is the perfect sweetness and in my humble opinion, the ultimate consistency- I don’t like too many chunks. Letting the fruit macerate overnight in sugar is the key to it breaking down. It does require planning ahead but it’s still a ridiculously easy jam to put up. It makes 4 half-pints and if you have an extended family that enjoys homemade preserves, it will be just enough.

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Strawberry Rhubarb Jam


  • Yield: 4 half-pints

Description

Strawberry Rhubarb jam is like spring in a jar!


Ingredients

  • 1 1/2 pounds strawberries
  • 1 1/2 pounds rhubarb stalks
  • 2 cups granulated sugar
  • 2 tablespoons lemon juice

Instructions

  1. Wash the strawberries and rhubarb well.
  2. Hull the berries and dice them into small pieces and chop the rhubarb into a 1/4 inch dice. Place the chopped berries and rhubarb in a glass or ceramic bowl with the sugar. Stir to combine and cover with a piece of plastic wrap. Let the fruit sit overnight, stirring occasionally.
  3. When you’re ready to cook the jam, prepare a small boiling water bath canner and four half pint jars and bring it to a boil. Place four new canning jar lids in a small pot and bring them to a bare simmer.
  4. Pour the fruit and all the liquid into your jam in a non-reactive pot and place it over medium-high heat. Bring the fruit to a rapid boil and stir regularly. You’ll need to adjust between medium-high an high heat to keep the fruit at a boil. It’s like a dance- just be careful not to let the jam scorch on the bottom- it can happen quickly!
  5. The jam should take about 20 minutes to cook but every kitchen is different so keep a close eye and know that time will vary. The jam is done when it is quite thick. You can tell that it’s ready when you pull a spoon through the jam and it doesn’t immediately rush in to fill that space. Stir in the lemon juice.
  6. Remove the jam from the heat and funnel it into the prepared jars. Wipe rims, apply lids and rings, and process in a boiling water bath canner for 10 minutes at sea level and add 5 minutes for every 1000 feet of altitude above 3000 feet. Don’t start your timer until the water returns to a boil.
  7. Remove jars from canner and set them to cool on a folded kitchen towel. When they are cool enough to handle, remove the rings and test the seals by grasping the edges of the lid and lifting the jar an inch or so from the countertop. If the lid holds fast, the jars are sealed. Any unsealed jars should be refrigerated and eaten within a week.

Notes

Living just below 7000 feet, I processed my jars for 25 minutes. Please refer to the USDA canning guide if you have any questions.